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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of The rising in the North; the 1569 rebellion found in the catalog.

The rising in the North; the 1569 rebellion

Sharp, Cuthbert Sir

The rising in the North; the 1569 rebellion

by Sharp, Cuthbert Sir

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  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Shotton in Durham City .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Reprint of the Memorials of the Rebellion of Earls of Northumberland and Westmoreland, edited by Sir Cuthbert Sharp, 1840.

    Other titlesMemorials of the Rebellion of the Earls of Northumberland and Westmoreland.
    StatementWith a new foreword by Robert Wood
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDA 356 R59 1975
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxii, 419 p.
    Number of Pages419
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26559577M
    ISBN 100905025008

    Abstract. Prophecies circulated in the north in the months preceding the rebellion. Some promised the arrival of better days, while others apparently threatened a turn for the worse if the Queen should put down the northern nobility. This work offers the first full-length study of the only armed rebellion in Elizabethan England. Addressing recent scholarship on the Reformation and popular politics, it highlights the religious motivations of the rebel rank and file, the rebellion's afterlife in Scotland, and the deadly.

    This is a List of Tudor Rebellions, referring to various movements which attempted to resist the authority of the Tudor Monarchs, who ruled over England and parts of Ireland between and Some of these were the product of religious grievances (for example Wyatt's Rebellion), some were regional or ethnic in nature (e.g. the Cornish Rebellion of ), though most combined an element of. - Beginning of the northern rebellion FOUND IN: Britain REFERENCES (4 citations): Child , "The Rising in the North" (1 text) Percy/Wheatley I, pp. , "The Rising in the North" (2 texts, one being that in the Reliques and the other being the manuscript copy) Leach, pp. , "The Rising in the North" (1 text).

    An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. Full text of "Memorials of the rebellion of ".   This article examines how the English crown turned the challenge posed by the Northern Rebellion to its financial and political advantage. In the aftermath of the revolt, the dictates of finance and patronage became intertwined with those of justice and mercy as Elizabeth with I sought profit from protest: from the disobedient she would.


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The rising in the North; the 1569 rebellion by Sharp, Cuthbert Sir Download PDF EPUB FB2

Rebellion: The Rising in the North [Cuthbert Sharp, Robert Wood] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Rebellion: The Rising in the North: Cuthbert Sharp, Robert Wood: Amazon.

This work offers the first full-length study of the only armed rebellion in Elizabethan England. Addressing recent scholarship on the Reformation and popular politics, it highlights the religious.

Get this from a library. The rising in the north: the rebellion: being a reprint of the 'Memorials of the rebellion of the Earls of Northumberland and Westmoreland'. [Cuthbert Sharp, Sir.;]. Published online: 26 May Participants in the northern rising (act.

–), launched the only major armed rebellion in Elizabethan England. This day in history, 9th Novemberis seen as the start of the Northern Rebellion or Rising of the North, the only major armed rebellion of Elizabeth I's reign.

The Northern Rebellion THE EARLS REBELLION. "THE RISING OF THE NORTH". () In the north of England, a large number of the nobility, gentry, and people remained firm in their attachment to the old faith. When the beautiful but unfortunate Mary Queen of Scots, having fled from her own country, came to England, put herself under the protection of Elizabeth, her cousin, but also enemy.

northern rebellion () The Northern Rebellion ofsometimes called The Rising of the North or The Revolt of The Northern Earls, was a major rebellion against Queen Elizabeth I.

It was the first of her reign and was led by two powerful northern lords, Thomas Percy, Earl of Northumberland (), and Charles Neville, Earl of Westmoreland (), in the autumn/winter of The Rising in the North: Rebellion.

Being a Reprint of the Memorials of the Rebellion of the Earls of Northumberland and Westmoreland, Edited by Sir Cuthbert Sharp Hardcover – 1 Nov. by Cuthbert Sharp (Editor), Robert Wood (Foreword) See all Format: Hardcover. Elizabeth was determined to ensure that the yeomen and artisans who had joined the rebellion paid a heavy price for their involvement.

Sir George Bowes was ordered ‘to invade, resist, subdue, slay, kill and put to execution of death by all ways and means.’ Men seem to have been selected at random from each ward to be hanged.

Of the known rebels identified in Durham, were selected. The Rising of the North 2 years ago Author: Claire Ridgway 2 Comments This day in history, 9th Novemberis seen as the start of the Northern Rebellion or Rising of the North, the only major armed rebellion of Elizabeth I’s reign.

The story of the Northern Rising ofwrites John Tomaney, points to enduring geographical fault lines in English life, albeit reworked in different historical contexts. But themes of an indifferent Court and a region let down by its leaders resonate today.

years ago, the north of England rose in rebellion against the Tudor state. The 'Rising of the North', inwas the most significant armed domestic rebellion that Elizabeth I faced during her reign, and yet few people in the north, and even fewer in the rest of England, have any knowledge or awareness of the uprising.

The rebellion led by Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland, and Thomas Percy, 7th Earl of Northumberland took place in November They and their followers occupied the city of Durham and celebrated a catholic mass in Durham Cathedral.

They tore up the English bible and prayer book and marched south to free Mary Queen of Scots and the Duke of Norfolk, and hoped to restore catholicism.

On 14 th November the great gates of Branspeth (1) were flung open and Richard Norton was seen advancing holding the standard, a gleaming crucifix.

His white hair streamed in the wind and his face was fired with high enthusiasm for what he deemed a holy and sacred cause. The rebels marched to Durham Cathedral (2), tore down Protestant images, overturned the communion table and celebrated.

The rebellion of the Northern Earls to the rebellion was swift. Most of the rebels retreated as soon as they heard that the Earl of Sussex and several thousand troops were marching north. FitzMaurice first attacked the English colony at Kerrycurihy south of Cork city in Junebefore attacking Cork itself and those native lords who refused to join the rebellion.

FitzMaurice's force of 4, men went on to besiege Kilkenny, seat of the Earls of Ormonde, in response, Sidney mobilised English troops, who marched south from Dublin and another landed by sea in Cork.

A-Level History Mind Map on Causes of the Northern Rebellion,created by on 30/05/ The Northern Earls had their power taken away from them by the establishment of the Council of the North. Earls disliked Elizabeth's "new men".

Rebellion The Rising in the North Memorials of the Rebellion of the Earls of Northumberland and Westmoreland Sharpe Cuthbert Editor Daisyroots Books Free Delivery in UK Web site always open for orders Cart: 0 item(s) - £ Home Shopping cart Checkout.

A Wainwright. The Rising of the North ofalso called the Revolt of the Northern Earls or Northern Rebellion, was an unsuccessful attempt by Catholic nobles from Northern England to depose Queen Elizabeth I of England and replace her with Mary, Queen of Scots.

The fourme of the othe made by such as haue made their humble submission to the Queenes Maiesties Commissioners, for their offences in the late rebellion begun in the North in Nouember.

and the twelfth yere of the raigne of the Queenes Maiestie, Elizabeth by the grace of God. In the late autumn ofin the 11th year of Queen Elizabeth's reign, an insurrection, known as the "Rising of the North" took place at the head of which were Thomas Percy, 7th Earl of Northumberland and Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland; t he aim of this movement was to re-establish the religion of their ancestors, to remove Evil Counsellors, to release the Scottish Queen Mary from her unjust .Remarkably, the rebellion led by the earls of Northumberland and Westmorland has never till now been the subject of a book-length study, though scholars have long recognised that it posed the most serious internal threat to the security of the Elizabethan regime.

Thankfully, Krista Kesselring's account of the causes, course and consequences of the rising is an extremely good one, which clears away .The Northern Rebellion ofled by Northumberland and Westmorland, and the decree of excommunication issued by Pope Pius V in certainly accelerated and codified the policy of strict religious uniformity, but Elizabethan England was already enforcing that policy before the Catholic Earls recruited 6, followers in protest against the Reviews: 6.